Book Review | Fangirl

Fangirl by Rainbow RowellFangirl by Rainbow Rowell

Hardcover, 438 pages

Published September 10th 2013

2.5/5 stars
Maaaaaaybe 3?
Nope … never mind … I won’t be swayed by the hype … solid 2.5 no higher

In a Word: Meh

And here we find ourselves yet again. Another hyped out of this world book that makes me question myself and my ability to enjoy books. I’m not sorry, but I don’t get it. *sigh*

And so, I will start this review with a short story of my own …

You know that moment when you are telling a story and suddenly realize … it’s boring as fuck? Well, some odd years ago, my friends and I (after hearing a comedian remark on the subject and coin the phrase to be mentioned) started using the phrase “… and then he stabbed him” as a means of pointing out that very moment. You know what I mean. You are going along, telling a fabulous story when you notice … nobody’s listening and … Oh shit, this story is actually really not great *insert* “… and then he stabbed him”.

Well … this is precisely how I think Rainbow Rowell should have finished this book. Just slap a big “… and then he stabbed him” on the end and done. Because this book was a snooze fest.

Honestly, there is no way I would have made it through this book if it hadn’t been an audiobook.

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Top 10 Tuesday | Top 10 Favorite Fathers in Fiction

Top 10 Tuesday is a weekly tag hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s prompt is…

Top 10 Favorite Fathers in Fiction


Father’s Day is this upcoming Sunday so let’s take some time to discuss some pretty amazing fathers in fiction! I am also extending this list to father figures as well because I think these guys deserve some recognition both in fiction and in real life!

But can we take a moment to mention the lack of amazing father representation in fantasy books? I didn’t realize it until I started sifting through my read list but way too many fathers are either dead, or evil? We need more positive father representation in fantasy.


To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper LeeTo Kill a Mockingbird (To Kill a Mockingbird #1) by Harper Lee

I don’t think you can make a list of fabulous fictitious fathers without including Atticus Finch, who is definitely one of the greatest book dads of all time!

This man is a shining example of integrity. He is an excellent roll model even when he questions his worth as a single father being judged by his community.

(Goodreads synopsis):

The unforgettable novel of a childhood in a sleepy Southern town and the crisis of conscience that rocked it, To Kill A Mockingbird became both an instant bestseller and a critical success when it was first published in 1960. It went on to win the Pulitzer Prize in 1961 and was later made into an Academy Award-winning film, also a classic.

Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, To Kill A Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior – to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos.”

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